Monthly Archive for: ‘January, 2011’

Those are my exclusive rights, hon

Sometimes intellectual property can get you very hot under the collar.

Read More
Subjects:

Fourth time lucky? A bill to reform patent law in the US

On Tuesday 25 January 2011, a bill to reform patent law in the US was introduced into Congress with bipartisan support.  The reform bill aims to simplify the patent application process, improve patent quality and keep the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) independently funded.  It marks the fourth consecutive time the Senate has attempted to implement patent reform.

Read More
Subjects:

US Judge finds cause of action for contributory cyber squatting

Most of you have accidentally misspelled a website name and journeyed into a forest of links, pop-up ads and webpages offering (admittedly complementary) pornography and Viagra, and would be fully aware of the existence of cyber squatting/typo squatting. 

Read More
Subjects:

Is a copyright registration system to prevent orphan works the way of the future?

Copyright law’s reason for existence is to encourage the creation of new artistic, dramatic, literary and other works by granting creators the exclusive right (subject to certain exceptions) to decide those who may use the work.  This exclusivity gives creators the opportunity to profit from their creative works, and, so the theory goes, enables society as a whole to benefit from the consequential increase in creative output.  However, copyright does impose a cost on copyright users, who are usually forced to pay to access creative works that they would otherwise be able

Read More
Subjects:

UPDATE: IHOP sues IHOP over IHOP trade mark infringement

In sad news for pancake-lovers everywhere, the famed American restaurant chain International House of Pancakes have dropped their trade mark infringement action against the International House of Prayer over its use of the IHOP acronym, agreeing to resolve the dispute out of court (see our previous post here).

Read More
Subjects:

Willy the Wizard fails first leg of Triwizard Tournament: US case dismissed

As readers will know, we’ve been following the copyright cases brought by the Estate of Adrian Jacobs (Paul Allen) against J K Rowling and her publishers in the United Kingdom and, more recently, in the United States. Now, Judge Shira Scheindlin of the US District Court, New York has granted Scholastic summary judgment against Paul Allen. Unless appealed, this brings the US leg of the Willy the Wizard saga to a close.

Read More
Subjects: