Monthly Archive for: ‘July, 2012’

Here come the men (and women) in purple: Olympic venues awash with “brand police”

As thousands of spectators, media and athletes descend on the Heathrow arrivals hall, and 3,500 soldiers are shipped in to bolster flailing security forces, another group is making its presence known in the nation’s capital.  Decked out in their purple caps and tops, they are the one-eyed, one-horned, flying purple brand police.

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Lead plaintiff settles in Australian thalidomide class action

A multi-million dollar settlement was reached this week for Lynette Rowe, the lead plaintiff in a landmark class action against manufacturers and distributors of the drug thalidomide.

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Trade Mark Protection Endorsed For Apartment Manager

Can a business obtain the registration of a trade mark for services where the mark concerned is also the name of the building from which the services are supplied?  This was the central issue for determination in a recent Federal Court decision involving the well-known Q1 building on the Gold Coast.

On 19 July 2012, Justice Reeves decided that this was no reason to prevent Mantra from obtaining a trade mark registration for “Q1” for the hotel and real estate services provided by it from the Q1 building.

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“If you have nothing nice to say…”: London 2012 restricts “mean” links to its website

Over the past few weeks we have kept you posted on some of the measures taken by London Games organisers to restrict the use of social media and to protect the rights of its official sponsors (see here and here).  In its latest move, the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

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An Eligible Patent? It’s a Divisive Issue

Despite recent Supreme Court authority on the issue, a judgment of the US Federal Circuit handed down on 9 July 2012 reveals that the test for patent eligibility is far from settled in the United States.

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Joustin’ Beaver v Justin Beaver: Eager beavers pip popstar to the post in proceedings as plaintiff

With teen pop sensation Justin Bieber gracing Australian shores (and pre-teen hearts) this week, we’ve noticed that it’s not just hordes of screaming girls that he’s been attracting.  He’s getting quite a following of lawsuits.  One that’s particularly sparked our fancy is the filing, by app-creator RC3, of a pre-emptive lawsuit against the Biebs, claiming the right to operate, maintain and distribute their ‘parody’ video game app ‘Joustin’ Beaver’.  That’s right.  It’s totes on between Justin Bieber and his arch-nemesis, a buck-toothed animated Beaver w

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What about the big kids? The new classification act introduces an R18+ category for computer games

The Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Amendment (R18+ Computer Games) Bill 2012 has been passed in both Houses and received Royal Assent by the Governor General to amend the Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995 (Cth) to create an R18+ category for computer games. This Act also amends the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 to recognise the new category.  The Act is due to commence on 1 January 2013.

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What’s in a name: One, or two directions?

Thought our One Direction song title puns were good?

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Meet the Partner – Scott Bouvier

Scott Bouvier is a partner specialising in IP in the King & Wood Mallesons Sydney office. He has acted for some of the country’s most interesting clients – from the Sydney Opera House and Andrew Lloyd Webber to CSIRO and University of Sydney.

But who is he really, and what’s his story? We interviewed Scott to find out.

What attracted you to IP law?

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