Category Archive for: ‘Defamation’

Are search results defamatory? Google’s not feeling lucky

Sticks and stones may break your bones, but search results can hurt you? At least, that seems to be way the Australian courts have been leaning. In the latest in a series of cases against Google, Google was unsuccessful in its bid to set aside a writ and statement of claim alleging defamation by their search results. The person bringing …

Read More
Subjects: |
Partner:

Solicitor’s defamation action dismissed for lacking ‘The Vibe’

The District Court of Queensland has dismissed a solicitor’s claim for defamation based on an imputation conveyed by the words ‘Dennis Denuto’. ‘It’s just the vibe of the thing, Your Honour’ says Dennis Denuto, the fictional solicitor-hero of the classic Australia legal drama, The Castle, as he bumbles his way to a victory in the High Court. In Smith v Lucht [2015] …

Read More
Subjects:
Partner:

Can a business stop an ex-employee from listing it as a former employer on LinkedIn?

And yes, this is a serious question.

Read More
Partner:

Guidelines released on the “right to be forgotten”

Search engines are no longer in the dark about how to interpret the now infamous “right to be forgotten” ruling of the European Court of Justice (“ECJ”), handed down in May this year (read our post on the decision here). On Wednesday 26 November, the European data protection authorities assembled in the “Article 29 Working Party” (“Working Party”) to adopt …

Read More

Negotiating the perils and pitfalls of corporate social media: a lesson from Madden v Seafolly

Online social media is now widely acknowledged as the new frontier of corporate communications.  Indeed, nearly 80 per cent of large companies now use social media to connect with their customers.  Having an online presence has become effectively mandatory, but with that comes a range of risks, including in relation to potentially misleading or defamatory statements. The recent decision in …

Read More
Partner:

The rise of the citizen journalist and the online blogger

Digital technologies and social networking websites have radically altered the nature of news reporting. In particular, news reporting has succumbed to modern society’s need for immediacy. The Internet has given rise to the “citizen journalist”, who is able to upload one-off breaking news items when arriving first upon the scene of an event. Whilst the increased access to newsworthy items …

Read More
Partner:

The ALRC releases Discussion Paper on “Serious Invasions of Privacy in the Digital Era”

As we foreshadowed last month, the Australian Law Reform Commission has recently released Discussion Paper 80, on “Serious Invasions of Privacy in the Digital Era”. The terms of reference for the discussion paper were to investigate the ways in which law can protect the privacy interests of the public, and in particular, come up with detailed mechanics for a new …

Read More

IP Whiteboard editor published in Internet Law Bulletin: Recent legal developments involving Twitter

If you still think that Tweeting is something only birds do, it’s time to fly the coop. Launched in 2006, Twitter is an online social networking site that enables its 645 million registered users worldwide to send and receive 140 character “Tweets”. More than 5700 Tweets are sent every second and up to 75% of mainstream journalists now find stories …

Read More

Think before you speak, think before you tweet –social media and defamation

While most of us are posting mundane Facebook statuses about what we had for breakfast, or tweeting about our reactions to ‘The Bachelor’ (or is that just me?), Andrew Farley was doing a whole lot more last year, according to a judgment published only recently, but handed down in November 2013 in the District Court of NSW. Farley posted a …

Read More
Partner:

Page 1 of 3123»