Archives for: ‘Technology, media, entertainment & telecommincations’

Sorry – your name isn’t on the list! Canada’s Supreme Court orders Google to de-index certain unlawful websites globally

A decision in June by Canada’s Supreme Court in Google Inc. v. Equustek Solutions Inc., 2017 SCC 34 has ordered Google to de-list certain unlawful websites from its search results worldwide. The decision has sparked immediate debate about the implications of such global takedowns on freedom of speech and on the power of Internet intermediaries. Background Equustek Solutions (Inc.) (Equustek), …

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Rock, racism and the Constitution: the US Supreme Court takes a different slant on trade marks

America! It’s a land of flags, Twinkies, NASCAR. and Constitutional amendments.  Matal v Tam (PDF) is the most recent warning not to get between an American and any of those things. The case concerned the application by a “new-wave dance rock” band to register their band name as a trade mark. Ordinarily, the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) would let …

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Blockchained to the rhythm: what are ‘distributed ledgers’ and could they help the music industry and copyright?

Forget Napster! One of the biggest problems in the music industry is the who, what, where, and why: which labels and publishers, performers, songwriters and producers own which rights and what split of royalties should be paid? Worse still: when are the songs being played, who by, and for what purpose? This occurs, in part, because of the labyrinthine distribution …

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Artifex Software v Hancom: Guidance from US District Court on enforcement of open source software licences

Open source software is regularly used as a way of leveraging the collective knowledge of the software development community by allowing anyone to improve and contribute to the code, provided they ‘pay it forward’ and allow their improved code to be used by the community. Open source software is often incorporated into proprietary software to avoid ‘reinventing the wheel’ – …

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Kick off! English Premier League kicks unauthorised live streaming as the UK High Court makes first “live” blocking order

Live streaming is a red-hot topic in the Australian IP sphere. In February this year, the streaming of Foxtel’s broadcast of the Mundine v Green fight kicked-off debate around sports rights, streaming and the role of social media as hosts. In the United Kingdom, the live streaming controversy extended beyond feisty Facebook comments when Arnold J made “live” blocking orders …

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‘Essential’ telecom patents: How to win FRANDs and influence people

The UK High Court’s 150+ page epic on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) licence terms in Unwired Planet v Huawei has stirred up a lot of commentary in the tech nerd space and the international patent community (across which there is probably a fair bit of overlap). The decision goes some way to standardising the terms under which mobile phone …

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Empire State (of mind) – noisy bars, brand shortening and obscured presentation – Mr Purvis QC speaks!

As you will know from previous posts (see here and here), when Appointed Persons speak, we listen! One of our favourites, it has to be said, is Mr Iain Purvis QC. He has a knack of getting straight to the point, with clear and memorable turns of phrase. Indeed one often finds oneself (if one is feeling particularly onesy) reading …

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How many codes must a man walk down? Coding and copyright cross paths in the FCA

For most of us, our exposure to software code is limited to the Matrix and those terrifying moments when you accidentally open Terminal on your Mac. However, as computers slowly and silently assume dominion over every facet of our lives, it’s inevitable that the mysteries of source code will increasingly confront us with novel challenges. In IPC Global Pty Ltd …

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Big data, big risk – investing in a “largely theoretical” industry

Between 31 May 2012 and 26 March 2013, an Australian husband and wife (Mr and Ms Vinson), through their self-managed superannuation funds, invested $1,250,000 and $1,625,000 respectively in a company that never earned any operating revenue. The company, Semantic Software Asia Pacific Limited (formerly Tralee Technology Holdings Pty Ltd) (Semantic), was a software company looking to establish itself in the …

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