What about the big kids? The new classification act introduces an R18+ category for computer games

The Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Amendment (R18+ Computer Games) Bill 2012 has been passed in both Houses and received Royal Assent by the Governor General to amend the Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995 (Cth) to create an R18+ category for computer games. This Act also amends the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 to recognise the new category.  The Act is due to commence on 1 January 2013.

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Fashionistas challenge Louboutin’s sole rights to red sole shoe – Louboutin asserts its claim to red is not yet dead

Last week the French Court of Appeal ruled that Zara could continue to sell shoes with red soles without infringing Louboutin’s "Red Sole Trade Mark".  Louboutin, famous for its red soled shoes, has engaged in an aggressive trade mark enforcement strategy in recent years, commencing proceedings against a range of fashion brands that have adopted the red sole look.

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“Faster, higher, stronger” restrictions on social media at the London 2012 Games

As the Olympic Torch travels down the east coast of Britain and preparations for the opening ceremony kick in to high gear, with live farm animals, a replica Glastonbury Tor and rain clouds all being brought in for the occasion, organisers and followers of London 2012 are increasingly turning their attention to a new issue, that of social media’s role in the Games of the XXX Olympiad. 

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Reveal Day

Last night, ICANN posted all applications for the new global Top Level Domains (gTLD) and who has applied for them.  Amazon made over 70 applications for words in English and Google made approximately 100 applications.  Interestingly,  Facebook did not make any applications.  In total, approximately 1900 applications were made.

You can read more about Reveal Day in our alert here.

 

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Subjects: Technology | Trade marks

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Two bands, One Direction: court!

It seems that originality continues to be an issue for boy bands.  “Well-known” UK teen heartthrobs One Direction may have taken a step in the wrong direction as media reports emerged concerning the filing of a lawsuit in the Californian US District Court alleging trade mark infringement and seeking an injunction preventing them from using that name.  The suit was filed by none other than One Direction, a US group with th read more...