Social media “influencers”: the do’s and don’ts of disclosure

It’s now a widely acknowledged reality that commercial organisations need defined social media strategies and policies in place as a framework for approaching the world of ’gramming, liking, sharing, connecting (and, a recent addition to the Facebook stable, “reacting”) online.  An increasingly important part of that strategy is often engaging social media ambassadors or “influencers” read more...

Lies, damned lies and social media coverage of trade mark disputes – the TV programme previously known as “Glee”?

Remember when you could rely on social media for fair, unbiased and objective coverage of the news? Me neither. The facts did not get in the way of a good story when a virtual Twitter-storm erupted over the weekend around the tv show GLEE having to change its name in the UK. But is this read more...
Subjects: Trade marks

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IP Whiteboard editor published in Internet Law Bulletin: Recent legal developments involving Twitter

If you still think that Tweeting is something only birds do, it’s time to fly the coop. Launched in 2006, Twitter is an online social networking site that enables its 645 million registered users worldwide to send and receive 140 character “Tweets”. More than 5700 Tweets are sent every second and up to 75% of read more...

Think before you speak, think before you tweet –social media and defamation

While most of us are posting mundane Facebook statuses about what we had for breakfast, or tweeting about our reactions to ‘The Bachelor’ (or is that just me?), Andrew Farley was doing a whole lot more last year, according to a judgment published only recently, but handed down in November 2013 in the District Court read more...
Subjects: Defamation | Media | Social media

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IP Whiteboard editors published in e-commerce law reports

In a case which carries a warning for Australian government employees, the Federal Circuit court confirmed earlier this year, in Banerji v Bowles, that a public servant may be dismissed for criticising government policies on Twitter, even though her profile was anonymous. Natalie Hickey and Samantha McHugh, from our editorial committee, have written an article read more...

#IntellectualProperty trending on Twitter: Considering IP in the age of the hashtag

Social media has transformed the ‘hash’ symbol (#) from a mere symbol key into a phenomenon of its own. Yet the addition of the # symbol before a word has not been so simple in the IP world and has many potential implications. For the uninitiated, let’s have a look at the hashtag’s capability. First, read more...

Federal Election 2013: who will be watching you?

The 2013 Australian Federal Election has already been coined the ‘Social Media Election’, but even savvy users who frequently turn to social media platforms to track trending political issues may have been surprised by last week’s announcement that Yahoo!7 and Seven News were partnering with Facebook to provide unique insights into Australian opinions on the read more...
Subjects: Media | Social media

Parody accounts on Facebook and Instagram: a no-go zone?

Our latest posts on the Adam Gilchrist parody Twitter account saga (see here and here) have generated such interest that we thought we’d do a little more digging. Could ‘Fake Gilly’, for instance, replicate his parody account on either Facebook or Instagram? The short answer is: ‘No’. While Twitter expressly allows the creation of parody read more...

Twitter Parody Accounts: The Inside Story on Adam Gilchrist’s Twitter Twin

Soon after publishing our post about Adam Gilchrist’s Twitter twin, we received a direct approach from @AdamCGilchrist, the account in question: “Hi, thanks for following. What are you saying I need to change on my account in your tweet? It was not my intention for all of this that has happened, it was supposed to read more...